GIRL REPORT | Girls Tour Logan’s Candy Shop

By Cassidy H. Girl Reporter

In early December, a group of Girl Scouts were able to tour Logan’s Candies Shop in Ontario, Ca. On the tour, the girls were able to view the process of how a candy cane is made just in time for Christmas!

IMG_6516It is a time sensitive process, because waiting too long to take action in certain steps will cause the candy cane to harden prematurely. After learning the process, the girls were introduced to the different flavors that are made in the shop, and how these many flavors and shapes are made, not just for Christmas candy canes, but for all different holidays. For example, during Easter the same candy cane will take the shape of an Easter egg adorned in bright, pastel colors.

IMG_6528After learning about candy-making process, it was time to learn about the history of the candy shop itself. Logan’s Candies Shop was opened in 1933, and since it opened, they have hand-crafted and flavored every candy cane made there, including the biggest candy cane ever made in the shop – a 16 foot long “colossal” cane that was crafted eighteen years ago. It weighs an incredible 36 pounds and can be purchased for a mere $1,800.

Following the history of the store was the history of the candy cane; first made in the 1800’s, the candy cane was intended to remind us of the shepherd’s staff from Jesus’ time.

IMG_6555Lastly, the Girl Scouts were given the opportunity to shape their own candy canes in any way they wanted. In order to do so, girls needed a piece of the candy cane before it was hardened. They  rushed to the table to shape their still-warm candy as fast as they could before it hardened – and they had to work fast – in only 20 seconds! Most girls decided to shape their candies into a heart.

This trip was both very fun and very educational for the Girl Scouts.  I hope more girls are able to attend a tour of Logan’s Candies Shop next Christmas season in 2016.


The Girl Reporter Program is proudly supported by:

California Community Colleges
Inland Empire/Desert Region
Doing What MATTERS for Jobs and the Economy

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